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overview

Overview 

This is a traditional ecopulped coffee from Dota near Tarrazu, Costa Rica, produced by 900 farmers organized around the cooperative CoopeDota. 

The flavor profile is sweet and clean with flavors of stone fruit and caramelized sugars, and a full, coating mouthfeel. 

Our roasters recommend higher than average heat energy early in the roast for best results.  

When brewed, the coffee may have a tendency to extract at low percentages so keeping an eye on ratio and grind size can improve your results. We’ll be serving this coffee as our light roast batch brew at The Crown. 

taste

Taste Analysis by Sandra Loofbourow 

It’s been a long time since I tasted a Costa Rican coffee; this one from CoopeDota leaves me wanting more! It’s an impeccable example of the best washed coffees from this origin. Get the extraction right and the cup will overflow with stone fruit sweetness – plums, nectarines, apricots, all balanced by the caramelized brown sugars and honey. Even a haphazard brew yields green apple acidity, candy-like sweetness, and a coating mouthfeel – it’s a forgiving coffee. We’ll be serving this as our light roast batch brew at The Crown, where it proves to be both chuggable and refreshing. 

source

Source Analysis by Mayra-Orellana Powell 

There is nowhere like Costa Rica when it comes to coffee cooperatives and Cooperativa de Caficultores de Dota R.L (CoopeDota), which was established in 1960, is one of the finest. 

It starts with an unmatched commitment to the environment. CoopeDota has a first of its kind certified carbon-neutral mill, which features hydro-powered energy consumption, water efficient eco-pulpers (also called a demucilager), and mechanical coffee dryers fueled by coffee parchment. 

Nearly 900 producer-members living throughout the canton of Dota within the province of San Jose, Costa Rica focus their attention on farm management throughout the year and then deliver their cherry to the CoopeDota mill where traceability and quality control are second to none. 

CoopeDota has an equally intricate model of income diversification with a profitable agriculture supply store and tourism department dedicated to showing off coffee farms to visitors. They also roast their own coffee and operate three cafes and a cupper/barista training center. Their commitment to the environment also extends to the community of Santa Maria de Dota where the cooperative manages trash pickup for the entire town. 

Green

Green Analysis by Chris Kornman 

Having worked with coffees from Coopedota for more than a decade now, I remain unequivocally impressed by their consistency. Reliably sorted and dried coffees are a pleasure for the roaster, and we have here yet another excellent example of high quality Costa Rica at its finest. Moisture and water activity for this selection are exactly in the pocket, while density is a shade above average. The screen size here is a classic 15-18 screened “European” prep from Central America, with a wide but clearly defined range of sizes. There’s very little to leave to guesswork here, either on the shelf or in the roaster. 

Classic dwarf cultivars grown by Coopedota’s members here include Caturra (a single-gene Bourbon mutation first identified in Brazil in 1937) and Catuaí, an engineered hybrid of Yellow Caturra and Mundo Novo (a spontaneous Typica-Bourbon hybrid). The short stature of these trees is favored by many growers, as one of the core benefits is more densely planted fields, which can increase the yield per hectare. 

diedrich ir-5

Diedrich IR-5 Analysis by Candice Madison 

Costa Rica in the house! Super happy to receive our first coffee from Tarrazu for the year. There are some origins that will always be cemented in my mind for quality and flavor profiles and Tarrazu is one of them. I roasted my first coffee from this region about 10 years ago and have been hooked ever since. 

This coffee is meticulously sorted, as it near always is from CoopeDota, as you have already read testimony of this from both Chris and Mayra! Although Doris and I were too eager to start roasting to wait for the green metrics, I knew what to expect and the coffee behaved accordingly – missteps and all! 

I roasted the coffee first as I knew the bean would most likely be dense, with on the nose moisture levels; I hedged most of my bets against the screen size. I was worried that if I didn’t compensate for what may be a wide range of sizes along the scale, I would roast to quickly or too slowly and ruin my batch. I decided caution was best and although starting at my usual 380F to charge the drum, I kept the gas at 90% to combat density and moisture but compensate for any smaller beans that may scorch early on.  

Although the roast dropped well and turned at an appropriate temperature, I could tell that things were starting to drag just after the turn, and increased the gas to 100%, but only for a short while, as the beans were taking on heat at a rate that I didn’t want to extend into Stage 2. I managed to at least balance the time in stages 1 & 2, but I wasn’t sure that the time I spent in stage 2 and the lower development time after first crack would suffice to create the deliciousness of a well-balanced and complex Costa Rican cup.  

Doris and I discussed the roast, and much like any form of teaching or feedback, things became clearer to me the more we spoke. The first roast was lovely, but quite delicate, with notes of dried cherry, sweet lime, simple syrup and milk chocolate. Delightful, but a little less complex than I knew the coffee to be. I wanted more out of each stage of the roast but realized that I didn’t want to necessarily change that flavor profile. I set Doris the task of finding a way to reduce the time spent in stage one, lengthen the time spent in stage two, and develop the post-crack exothermic stage a little more, by lengthening the end of the roast.  

The solve was obvious to Doris; follow the gas changes, for the most part, but change the timing! By putting in 100% gas before the turning point – much earlier than I did, Doris was able to super charge the roast in the early moments of stage one. Carrying this gas application through equilibrium, she was able to step down off the gas much earlier than I was. The early, intense heat application paid off. Doris’ final gas change was halfway through the Maillard stage, at 366F, with first crack at 377F. Allowing that steady ascent, as well as a little extra time in the post-crack stage, made all the difference. Doris was able to shave 10 seconds off stage one, apply that to lengthening stage 2, and then by only spending 3 seconds extra after first crack, she was able to add significantly to the development ratio.  

The proof would be in the cup, and it was, the aroma was pure heaven, and first sip brought notes of plum compote, Pink Lady apples, lime acidity mellowed by a cotton candy sweetness, cantaloupe melon, an unexpected a lovely bass note of light molasses, and a silky velvety body. Just what I was looking for – thanks Doris! 

quest m3s

Quest M3s Analysis by Evan Gilman 

Unless otherwise noted, I follow a set standard of operations for all my Quest roasts. Generally, I’ll allow the machine to warm up for 15 minutes until my environmental temperature reading is at least 250F, weigh out 150g batch size, and begin roasting when I’ve reached my desired charge temperature.  Read my initial post here and my updated post here. 

Looking back at my history of home roasting, this may have been one of the very first coffees I roasted. Not a bad place to start, if you ask me. I was working at an up-and-coming roaster, and the green manager was kind enough to give me a pound of this (and a pound of Guatemala ASOBAGRI) to roast on my Poppery II. More than 10 years later, and I still enjoy roasting this coffee almost as much as I enjoy drinking it.  

This time around, I do believe I may have gotten a bit excited about roasting this lot on the Quest M3s. My planning did not work out entirely as I had expected! I did know that this coffee was quite dense and would soak up a lot of heat initially. This was indeed the case, and this roast had one of my lowest turning points in recent memory – 180F, even with my environmental temperature of 275F and my charge temp of 390F at the bean temp probe. This may be a candidate for a smaller batch size – I used 200g for this roast, and could have gone with my standard 150g and had an easier time with heat application. 

In any event, I started out with 10A heat application, and turned off a little before Turning Point. Keeping heat application on would have been a better way to go, to be honest. Seeing that my rate of rise was peaking a little low, I decided to keep airflow at a minimum while this roast crept through the first stage, but engaged fan to 3 at 275F / 4:25 in anticipation of Maillard. At 300F / 5:10, I reduced heat application to 7.5A, but kept fan at 3 until 315F / 5:40, then increased fan to full. The rate of rise was steady even through these manipulations and didn’t begin to fall until just after I lowered heat application to 5A at 360F / 7:00. This coffee has a lot of momentum once it gets going! At 375F / 7:45, just before first crack, I cut heat application and allowed the coffee to develop through the post-crack stage on its own. I dropped the roast at 402F / 9:15, a bit hotter and later than I usually do.  

Coulda woulda shouldas notwithstanding, this coffee was still incredibly tasty in the cup, and after all these years, still a learning experience. Yes, I felt that it was slightly underdeveloped, but there is tons of sweetness and acidity to work with here. I got abundant cantaloupe and green apple-y malic acids, black tea with lemon and honey, and just a touch of cocoa powder on the finish. More development, and more time proportionally spent in Maillard would really bring out the clean, hard candy sweetness that I just know this coffee has.  

Hit this coffee with lots of heat on the charge and keep that airflow going to carry away moisture during the first stage of roast. This coffee is super fresh and ready to be roasted. For those of you who enjoy a darker roast, this coffee will maintain plenty of sweetness even through second crack. Highly recommended for any brewing application, as well! CoopeDota has been providing solid, delicious, consistent coffee for years, and this one is no exception.  

ikawa pro v3

Ikawa Pro V3 Analysis by Nate Lumpkin 

As of September 2020 we are running all Crown Jewel Analysis roasts on an Ikawa Pro V3, using the most recent app and firmware version on “closed loop” setting. 

Overall, this coffee was very well behaved in our Ikawa V3, and produced some delicious roasts. As Evan and Candice noted in their roast analyses, this coffee responded best with high heat on the charge and a fast duration. That profile, our standard hot profile, produced notes in the cup of juicy summer stone fruit like nectarine and apricot, a lemon acidity and honey sweetness, and surprising deep sugar notes like toffee, nougat, caramel, and peanut brittle. A smaller, denser coffee like this one  seems to work well with a push at the beginning. 

Lengthening the Maillard phase by thirty seconds produced a thicker and more pungent cup, with notes of grape, cherry, dark fig, and herbal liqueur. However, I also tasted a mild astringency, an unexpected ashiness, and an overall muddled quality–the tasting notes weren’t as well differentiated as I would like. Our longer low airflow profile was really nice, with notes of apple, pear, and raspberry candy, with a tea-like body and some light floral notes, but overall I’d say I’d prefer the hotter profile.  

You can download the profile to your Ikawa Pro app here:
Roast 1:Crown Standard SR 1.0          
Roast 2:Crown Maillard +30 SR 1.0          
Roast 3:Crown 7m SRLowAF2    

brew

Brew Analysis by Nate Lumpkin 

 Small, dense coffees like this Costa Rica are usually well-behaved on pour-over, so I decided to do a simple comparison between the Saint Anthony C70 and the Fellow Stagg, thinking that the difference between the steep conical walls of the C70 and the flat bottom of the Stagg would make for a good contrast. At the Crown we’ve been working with the Hario V60 regularly for service, so I decided to switch it up and use the C70.  

At first I tried brewing this coffee with my standard recipe: 18g of coffee and 300g of water, for a ratio of 1:16.6, which is usually a real winner. However, I found that my first two brews came out with an extremely low TDS and extraction. Its flavors were clear and juicy, but the body was too thin and watery. After grinding a full notch finer than usual and increasing the dose by 2g, I was able to achieve a delicious cup with a workable TDS of 1.25 and a somewhat low extraction, as well as a somewhat longer brew of 3:29. Nevertheless, this brew tasted gorgeous: bright stone fruits, like apricot, plum, and nectarine, freshly cut pink apple, and berries, with a rich candy-like sweetness, like salted caramel, nougat, and milk chocolate. This was a juicy and fresh-tasting cup, with a long coating finish, like caramel candy.  

On Stagg, this coffee brewed a touch faster, at 3:01, with the higher TDS and extraction I usually associate with this brewer. This produced a heavier cup, with notes of strawberry, grapefruit, lime candy, candied orange peel, salted caramel, and milk chocolate. Its heavy body and fudgy chocolate flavors reminded me of a warm chocolate croissant! I would recommend reaching for a brewer like this one if you want to highlight this coffee’s heavier, more candy-like qualities, though I would say my preference is for the former recipe, with its excellent balance of stone fruit juiciness and caramel sweetness. Either way you can’t really go wrong, though watch out for this coffee’s tendency to brew with a lower extraction.  

Origin Information

Grower
Cooperativa de Caficultores de Dota R.L. (CoopeDota) | 900 members
Variety
Catuai, Caturra
Region
Dota, San José, Costa Rica
Harvest
October 2020 - February 2021
Altitude
1550 – 1950 masl
Soil
Volcanic loam
Process
Eco-pulped and dried in the sun and mechanical driers
Certifications

Background Details

There is nowhere like Costa Rica when it comes to coffee cooperatives and Cooperativa de Caficultores de Dota R.L (CoopeDota), which was established in 1960, is one of the finest. It starts with an unmatched commitment to the environment. CoopeDota has a first of its kind certified carbon-neutral mill, which features hydro-powered energy consumption, water efficient eco-pulpers (also called a demucilager), and mechanical coffee dryers fueled by coffee parchment. Nearly 900 producer-members living throughout the canton of Dota within the province of San Jose, Costa Rica focus their attention on farm management throughout the year and then deliver their cherry to the CoopeDota mill where traceability and quality control are second to none. CoopeDota has an equally intricate model of income diversification with a profitable agriculture supply store and tourism department dedicated to showing off coffee farms to visitors. They also roast their own coffee and operate three cafes and a cupper/barista training center. Their commitment to the environment also extends to the community of Santa Maria de Dota where the cooperative manages trash pickup for the entire town.