fbpx

intro

“Stopped in our tracks” might be an appropriate description of the effect this coffee had on our first analysis table. Such lush tropical fruit notes and zesty acidity accompanied by delightful sweetness and velvety mouthfeel, we kept coming back to this coffee from Central Guatemala to have another taste.

Most look to western Guatemala for coffee, but there is something exciting to offer right in the middle of the country. Finca San Lorenzo is a 225 acre estate in the less traveled department of Alta Verapaz near the city of Coban. Luis Valdés, affectionately called “Wicho” to distinguish him from his father and grandfather who are also named Luis, has been running San Lorenzo since 1999.

Wicho started following his father around the estate when he was young and later earned an agricultural engineering degree before taking the reins. Constant rain year-round at Finca San Lorenzo creates some unique challenges. Wicho has used his life-long experience and education to overcome this obstacle. The entire estate is terraced to protect against erosion during the heavy summer rains. Wicho has also created several different drying strategies (raised beds and mechanical dryers) to cope with the unpredictability of winter rains during the harvest.

Dried parchment is taken to San Isabel, a dry mill in Guatemala City.  San Isabel is equipped with multiple pieces of equipment to sort green coffee typical in most dry mills, such as, gravity beds, screens and electronic eyes. The mill also has a piece of equipment called a catadora, which is placed immediately after the dehuller and operates like a wind channel to remove broken and less dense coffee beans. Mild weather in Guatemala City provides ideal conditions for storing parchment in the warehouse until it is time to export.

We’re pleased to offer this coffee both as full sized 69kg bags and 10kg Crown Jewel boxes; but I’d expect at this impressive quality they won’t last long.

green

Yet another shining example of exceptional post-harvest handling. This coffee is perfectly dried and of high density and classic 16-19 screen size, in line with standard Central American “EP” prep standards. The bulk of the coffee is quite large in size, perhaps a contribution of the hybrids grown on the farm.

In addition to legacy Bourbon and heritage dwarf cultivars Caturra and Catuaí, Wicho is also growing some introgressed hybrids to improve the disease and climate resilience of his farm, a wise choice in wet climates that can stimulate the proliferation of fungi like rust. On San Lorenzo, Sarchimors (a group of hybrids, a cross of Costa Rican dwarf Bourbon mutation and the Timor Hybrid) fill in the gap. Obata, one of Wicho’s selections, is a Brazilian-bred Sarchimor released in 2000.

ikawa

Fresh out of the gates with a newly tweaked Ikawa profile for incoming Central American coffees, this coffee roasted up really nicely and offered a lot of depth at this sample roast style profile; probably the best performance of any coffee roasted to the new curve this week. The San Lorenzo’s acidity was sharp as a tack, yet complimented nicely by plenty of sweetness and tropical fruit flavors. It’s nothing but a pleasure to taste this Guatemala, and this roast showed of the coffee’s potential admirably.

You can download the profile to your Ikawa Pro app here:
Roast 1: RC ck 6.5m afmod 6.2019 3rd

Origin Information

Grower
Luis “Wicho” Valdés, Finca San Lorenzo
Variety
Bourbon, Catuaí, Caturra, Obata, Sarchimor
Region
San Cristobal, Cobán, Alta Verapaz, Guatemala
Harvest
November - April
Altitude
1400-1500 masl
Soil
Clay minerals
Process
Fully washed after pulping and fermenting, then dried in the sun.
Certifications

Background Details

Most look to western Guatemala for coffee, but there is something exciting to offer right in the center of the country. Finca San Lorenzo is a 225 acre estate in the less traveled department of Alta Verapaz near the city of Coban. Luis Valdés, affectionately called “Wicho” to distinguish him from his father and grandfather who are also named Luis, has been running San Lorenzo since 1999. Wicho started following his father around the estate when he was young and later earned an agricultural engineering degree before taking the reins. Constant rain year-round at Finca San Lorenzo creates some unique challenges. Wicho has used his life-long experience and education to overcome this obstacle. The entire estate is terraced to protect against erosion during the heavy summer rains. Wicho has also created several different drying strategies (raised beds and mechanical dryers) to cope with the unpredictability of winter rains during the harvest. Dried parchment is taken to San Isabel, a dry mill in Guatemala City. San Isabel is equipped with multiple pieces of equipment to sort green coffee typical in most dry mills, such as, gravity beds, screens and electronic eyes. The mill also has a piece of equipment called a catadora, which is placed immediately after the dehuller and operates like a wind channel to remove broken and less dense coffee beans. Mild weather in Guatemala City provides ideal conditions for storing parchment in the warehouse until it is time to export.