overview

Overview

This is a traditional natural coffee from Gashoho, Muyinga Province, Burundi, produced by smallholder farmers organized around Bavyeyi III processing station.

The flavor profile is full of ripe blackberry notes, complimented by a rich chocolatey structure and hints of lemony acidity.

Our roasters found the coffee benefited from a balance of ratios in drying and color change stages.

When brewed with both standard and unconventional methods the coffee showed remarkable versatility and bold fruit-forward flavors.

taste

Overview

This is a traditional natural coffee from Gashoho, Muyinga Province, Burundi, produced by smallholder farmers organized around Bavyeyi III processing station.

The flavor profile is full of ripe blackberry notes, complimented by a rich chocolatey structure and hints of lemony acidity.

Our roasters found the coffee benefited from a balance of ratios in drying and color change stages.

When brewed with both standard and unconventional methods the coffee showed remarkable versatility and bold fruit-forward flavors.

source

Taste Analysis by Chris Kornman

High quality natural coffees are still a relatively new trend for Burundi. Perhaps as recently as a decade ago, fruit-dried coffee would have been relegated to below-grade status and traded at discounts. However, with improved awareness, market access, demand, and drying practices (including single-cherry layers on raised beds), gorgeous natural coffees have been a staple of recent imports. Burundi’s 2021 harvest was relatively small, and with demand for natural coffees higher than ever, this small lot from Bavyeyi is our only such Crown Jewel for the season.

It is a berry bomb. Sun-ripened blackberry notes create a juicy, sweet impression on the tongue, with subtler hints of yellow nectarine (the kind you have to eat over the sink), candy and caramel-like sweetness, a dense chocolatey structure, and hints of lemony acidity. We’re loving this coffee brewed in small batches and think it might be a perfect option for ice as well, just in time for peak summer coffee drinking.

 

green

Source Analysis by Charlie Habegger

Jeanine Niyonzima-Aroian, the founder of JNP Coffee, is without a doubt one of the most influential individuals in Burundi coffee today.   Raised in the capital city of Bujumbura, Jeanine would go on to earn an MBA from Northwestern University’s prestigious Kellogg School, cycle through corporate America, and eventually reconnect with her birth country by founding Burundi Friends International, a not-for-profit funding educational and economic empowerment programs for rural Burundians, which is now in its 13th year. After a few years marketing Burundi coffees stateside for friends and family, Jeanine realized she had every reason to lead the business, and JNP Coffee was born.

Muyinga province is lesser known for coffee than Kayanza or Ngozi provinces to the west, but that is precisely why Jeanine and her quality team were interested in investing here. Burundi, like Rwanda to its north, is a gifted territory for coffee: elevations are consistently high, soils are generously fertile, and its arabica cultivars are unique to the rest of the coffee-producing world. Muyinga province is no exception but has not seen the same level of investment as the more developed producing regions closer to Bujumbura. JNP has for years managed a processing station in Ngozi, whose popularity has grown over time. This past harvest they began receiving cherry from yet another group of farmers, from the Gashoho municipality just over the border in Muyinga.

Bavyeyi in Kirundi translates to “parents,’’ a name given to honor the generations of hardworking parents, like Jeanine’s own, whose labor in coffee (something many farming families either do not consume or cannot afford to consume) provides shelter, nourishment, and educational opportunities to their children. While this lot is uniquely coffee harvested by Gashoho farmers, the total number of farmers contributing to Bavyeyi is now over 2,000. All participating farmers qualify for JNP’s Dushime program, a second-payment incentive for delivering the highest quality, which is paid at the end of each harvest, and which varies from 20-40 cents per pound. 

Drying naturals in the high and cool Muyinga climate is a painstakingly slow process, often taking 20-30 days to complete, during which the coffee is continuously circulated for even air exposure. Despite having one of the longest drying periods in the world, the cup profile is noticeably balanced and crisp. 

diedrich ir-5

Diedrich IR-5 Analysis by Doris Garrido

I tasted Burundi naturals from this same group last year and now I got my opportunity to do my own roast. Guided by the green analysis, I noticed this coffee came with average density which helped me to build my roasting plan.

I decided to charge at 411F with 70% gas. 30 seconds later 50% air was added. Turning point happened at 189F at 1:24 minutes. My approach for this roast basically was to start with enough power to push from the beginning to a high rate of rise and control it from there before yellowing. At 2:38 I started lowering my gas; rate of rise was peaking and I wanted to drop just a little to have sufficient heat/time to reach a nice caramelization during Maillard phase. The main goal was to balance the fruity flavor from the natural process but with a clean juicy acidity. From here I dropped gas to the lowest 30% just before color change.

I got a great balance between drying and yellowing and hit first crack at 384.5F, which was quiet at the beginning, I needed to check for the puffy little coffees in the trier to make sure it was really happening. My rate of rise at this moment (FC) was at 13/60 sec, which is normal for me when roasting washed coffees, but this one was releasing too much energy and I decided to kill the burners, and was able to achieve a development time of 1:17 seconds. I dropped the coffee at 394.5F, and I was happy with the results. I was not disappointed the next day with cupping notes: Candy-like, blackberry, cranberry, ripe fruits, and ripe grapes; juicy, clean, silky. I got a fairly good roast, and I was not surprised. This is a well processed coffee; I can tell by the way it behaves in the roaster and the resulting clean cup.

aillio bullet r1

Aillio Bullet R1 IBTS Analysis by Evan Gilman

Unless otherwise noted, we use both the roast.world site and Artisan software to document our roasts on the Bullet. You can find our roast documentation below, by searching on roast.world, or by clicking on the Artisan links below.

Generally, we have good results starting our 500g roasts with 428F preheating, P6 power, F2 fan, and d6 drum speed. Take a look at our roast profiles below, as they are constantly changing!

Approaching this immaculate raised bed natural coffee from Burundi, I was struck by how little ‘naturalness’ came through in the green. Perhaps I have been influenced by the intensely fruited coffees we’ve been seeing from Ecuador, but this coffee came across as a very subtle version of the in-your-face naturals that seem to get a lot of attention. But soft – what deliciousness lay in wait after roasting?

I wanted to give this coffee the same attention a more typical natural would have and approached heat application with a cautious but firm hand. Moisture content and water activity here were just below the usual distribution, but there was a fair distribution in screen size, which would lead to a little resistance to heat application. Nothing too aberrant, though. I went into this roast with 500g of coffee at the usual 428F charge temp, but with P9 power and F1 fan to really move this coffee through drying. This was the firm part of ‘cautious but firm.’

As the coffee moved quickly through drying, I lowered heat application to P8, then P7 with a concurrent increase in fan speed to F2, then F3 as the RoR peaked at 20F/min. This had the desired effect of slowing this roast down through Maillard, where I spend the majority of the roast. At 365F I lowered heat further to P6, and then increased fan speed to F4 at First Crack. That was the ‘cautious’ part. I went even further to F5 after 45 seconds post-crack development to really abate any smoky flavors and keep this roast pristine. My final ratio of Green/Maillard/Post-Crack Development was 42% / 44% / 12%, and I couldn’t be happier with the results.

The time spent in Maillard really helped to highlight the curious and gentle fruity flavors of this coffee. While I was first taken aback by a zingy watermelon jolly rancher fruitiness, this coffee’s complexity really came through on cooling. Most interesting was an anise-like note that reminded me positively of Fernet Branca, with a crisp rose apple tartness in the finish. The flavors here were so unique that I kept coming back for sips, trying to figure out exactly what it was I was tasting – fun, and confounding!

You’re unlikely to find a more interesting fruit-dried coffee in the near future, in my estimation. There’s just tons to unpack here, and it’s likely the long drying times and incredible attention to detail during processing are what make this coffee so interesting. Have fun roasting this coffee, you’re likely to have a long journey into flavor country once you’ve finished!

https://roast.world/@egilman/roasts/uhqjvzSl5bCscZjypA5Uq

brew

Brew Analysis by Joshua Wismans

With this coffee, we’re dealing with two distinct features – Burundi cultivars and the natural process. The beautiful character of Burundi coffees shine through with signature raisin and plum acidity, married in this coffee with the berry and sweet chocolate flavors brought to it through natural processing. In brewing this coffee, we chose methods that would allow both to pop and shine, subvert expectations, and bring us into the frontiers of where coffee is headed.

For my first brew, my inclinations brought me back to my experiences with the Aeropress. Nearly as distinct as this coffee, the Aeropress allows us to throw all of our expectations out the window. Time, immersion, and pressure combine in endless ways to bring forth untold expressions from the coffees that this brewer meets. For my method, I use the following parameters: 20 grams ground significantly finer than pour over (3.5 on an Ek43), and 215 grams of water. This gives me the unusual ratio of 1:10.75, a lopsided ratio balanced through the short brew time and hotter brew temperatures (206 degrees Fahrenheit). In the upright position, I’ll put the coffee in the Aeropress, and all at once dose the 215 grams of water. Let the brew sit for 30 seconds, stir for 10, then begin your plunge. The results are an electric brew ripe with flavors of raspberry, nectarine, rose, and toffee.

When approaching this coffee with a more straightforward pour-over option, I gravitated toward the P70 by Saint Anthony Industries. I updosed just slightly on this coffee using a ratio of 1:15, again seeking a counterpoint to some of the more tea-like brews and towards a more pronounced expression of the coffee. The results were round, sweet, and exciting, highlighting notes of ripe nectarine, fudge, and cashew.

Each brew showed the versatility of this coffee in both conventional and unconventional brew methods. It’s a beautiful bean that will shine in all your experiments!

Origin Information

Grower
Smallholder farmers organized around Bavyeyi III processing station
Variety
Local bourbon cultivars
Region
Gashoho, Muyinga Province, Burundi
Harvest
April - July
Altitude
1715 masl
Soil
Volcanic loam
Process
Full natural and dried on raised beds
Certifications

Background Details

Jeanine Niyonzima-Aroian, the founder of JNP Coffee, is without a doubt one of the most influential individuals in Burundi coffee today.   Raised in the capital city of Bujumbura, Jeanine would go on to earn an MBA from Northwestern University’s prestigious Kellogg School, cycle through corporate America, and eventually reconnect with her birth country by founding Burundi Friends International, a not-for-profit funding educational and economic empowerment programs for rural Burundians, which is now in its 13th year. After a few years marketing Burundi coffees stateside for friends and family, Jeanine realized she had every reason to lead the business, and JNP Coffee was born.    Muyinga province is lesser known for coffee than Kayanza or Ngozi provinces to the west, but that is precisely why Jeanine and her quality team were interested in investing here. Burundi, like Rwanda to its north, is a gifted territory for coffee: elevations are consistently high, soils are generously fertile, and its arabica cultivars are unique to the rest of the coffee-producing world. Muyinga province is no exception, but has not seen the same level of investment as the more developed producing regions closer to Bujumbura. JNP has for years managed a processing station in Ngozi, whose popularity has grown over time. This past harvest they began receiving cherry from yet another group of farmers, from the Gashoho municipality just over the border in Muyinga. Bavyeyi in Kirundi translates to “parents,’’ a name given to honor the generations of hardworking parents, like Jeanine’s own, whose labor in coffee (something many farming families either do not consume or cannot afford to consume) provides shelter, nourishment, and educational opportunities to their children. While this lot is uniquely coffee harvested by Gashoho farmers, the total number of farmers contributing to Bavyeyi is now over 2,000. All participating farmers qualify for JNP’s Dushime program, a second-payment incentive for delivering the highest quality, which is paid at the end of each harvest, and which varies from 20-40 cents per pound.   Drying naturals in the high and cool Ngozi climate is a painstakingly slow process, often taking 20-30 days to complete, during which the coffee is continuously circulated for even air exposure. Despite having one of the longest drying periods in the world, the cup profile is noticeably balanced and crisp.