fbpx

Brazil Coffee

Brazil has the world’s largest specialty farms–indeed, a “small” estate might be 500 planted acres. For this reason, the truly small farms of the country often go unremarked. About half of Brazil’s coffee producers are family estates with fewer than 10 hectares and minimal mechanization, relying on quality and strong cooperative representation to progress in their work. With this type of range, it’s no surprise that Brazil has, despite its naysayers, some of the world’s best coffees, easily some of its best diversity, and some of its most environmental farm management.

Learn About Brazil’s Regions

Alta Mogiana

Mogiana is the “coffee” name of the growing region located in São Paulo state, among the more renowned producing regions in the country. We buy from Cooperativa dos Cafeicultores e Agropecuáristas de Ibiraci (Cocapil), which was established in 2001 and currently has 1,200 active members, as well as the formidable Fazenda Rainha, a multi-generation estate with more than 200 hectares of yellow bourbon and numerous finalist placements in Brazil’s Cup of Excellence.

Bahia

Among the most unique and interesting coffee origins you’ll find anywhere in the world, the vast state of Bahia boasts Brazil’s most culturally diverse population and is the heart of biodynamic agriculture for the country. Increased representation at top spots in recent competitions has put Bahia on the map as a rapidly rising star for specialty coffee production.

Cerrado Mineiro

The Cerrado (or “savannah”) is a protected growing region of northwestern Minas Gerais state, where gently rolling hills and lots of sunshine make for good conditions favoring natural dried coffees. This year we’ve sourced our coffee from the Plato Azul farm, a Rainforest Alliance certified estate.

Chapada Diamantina

Some of the Brazil’s most exciting coffees are being grown in the Chapada Diamantina of Bahia state, a mountainous region bordering a lush national park. The vast state of Bahia boasts Brazil’s most culturally diverse population and is the heart of biodynamic agriculture for the country. Increased representation at top spots in recent competitions has put Bahia on the map as a rapidly rising star for specialty coffee production. We work with producer Luca Allegro, who has established a pair of medium estates growing unique cultivars under ideal conditions and biodynamic and organic practices.

Mantiqueira de Minas & Sul de Minas

The southern reaches of Minas Gerais state, near the border with “Mogiana” are among the most popular specialty coffee growing regions. Within Sul de Minas, farmers grow coffee in municipalities as diverse as Poços de Caldas in the São Sebastião da Grama Valley, or Carmo de Minas in the Serra da Mantiqueira mountain range, which include an “Indication of Origin” as the “Mantiqueira de Minas.” What these southern farms have in common is their generally smaller size, higher elevations, hand-harvesting practices, and reputation for exceptional flavor profiles.

Matas de Minas

The “forests” of Minas Gerais state in the east include one of our perennial favorite coffees from RFA and organic certified producer Fazenda Klem. The Klem family have spent more than 50 years producing organic coffee on 430 acres, and by no means alone. The Klem family has a partnership with 50 families who work on the estates and share in the profits.