INTRODUCTION BY CHRIS KORNMAN

Nariño is situated just to the south of the more commonly known Cauca department along Colombia’s Pacific coast. The Andes have a significant impact on the topography in Western Colombia, and right in the heart of these mountains, not far from the border of Ecuador one can find the municipality of Buesaco, the origin of our 35731 – Colombia Nariño San Antonio Nilson López Caturra GrainPro

In the last few years, this area of Colombia has recaptured the attention of specialty roasters. In many ways all the natural ingredients are perfect for growing coffee – elevation, climate, soil type, varieties, and other important factors all align to create a suitable environment for cultivation. Regional conflict and remote farms have made accessibility difficult in the past, but increased globalization and a revitalized effort to improve the livelihood of the agricultural industry workers has enabled better access to the exceptional coffees that can be grown here.

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It should be noted that despite ideal conditions, great coffee wouldn’t be possible without an exceptionally attentive and careful farmer. Nilson López’s micro-lot is 100% Caturra, fully washed and dried under the sun. The Caturra cultivar was first found in Brazil in the early part of the 20th century and is a natural mutation of the heirloom Bourbon variety. While the trees traditionally yield good quantity, they are also renowned for their high quality. The tradeoff, of course, is that they need constant care in the form of frequent pruning and fertilization.

The Colombia Nariño San Antonio Nilson López Caturra GrainPro comes to us from Sr. López’s farm, called Finca San Antonio. Sr. López and his family have been active participants in the operation of the 24 acre farm since he inherited it ten years ago from his parents. Nilson uses his own micro-mill to process harvested cherries, which allows for meticulous care in depulping, fermenting, and drying the coffee. In 2012, Sr. López’s mother was recognized for their family’s efforts with a first place finish in the Cup of Excellence. The result is a big, juicy coffee full of red fruit and citrus.

GREEN ANALYSIS & SCREEN SIZE BY CHRIS KORNMAN
MOISTURE: 10.7%     DENSITY: 71 g / mL

Our 35731 – Colombia Nariño San Antonio Nilson López Caturra GrainPro is typically dense, almost certainly a direct result of the high elevation at which it was grown. Colombia, as in many regions of the world, classifies their coffee pre-export by screen size. This lot is an Excelso, which means that the coffee is predominantly between screen sizes 15 to 16.

The very tight distribution of size is just one factor that contributes positively to the cleanliness and consistency of this lot. The coffee has clearly been dried nicely in the sun based on the very solid 10.7% moisture reading. The fact that the lot is a single variety from a single farmer means that the roaster can expect this coffee to perform consistently from batch to batch, and the barista should expect similar consistency from brew to brew.

ROAST ANALYSIS BY JEN APODACA

After our first taste of the 35731 – Colombia Nariño San Antonio Nilson López Caturra GrainPro on the cupping table it was clear that this was a very sweet coffee with abundant blackberry, apple, peach, vanilla, and florals that intensified as the coffee cooled in the cup. We wanted to explore how resilient this coffee could be. Displayed in the graph above are two different approaches to roasting with different brewing methods in mind.

The first roast, PR-0095 (red) was roasted to be within cupping specifications and for pourover evaluation. After the roast reaches first crack, the amount of citric and malic acids will begin to lower in intensity with the combination of higher temperatures and length of time in the roaster. With this in mind, we did not want to exceed 2 minutes of development time after the roast. The second roast, PR-0096 (blue) was taken to second crack and intended for pour over and and espresso. Lengthening the development time to increase the ratio of sugar browning to enzymatic acids is an obvious solution. Delaying our first gas adjustment by 45 seconds also created a slower rate of rise through the maillard stage in an effort to create more body in the cup.

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BREW ANALYSIS BY EVAN GILMAN

After our first taste of the 35731 – Colombia Nariño San Antonio Nilson López Caturra GrainPro on the cupping table it was clear that this was a very sweet coffee with abundant blackberry, apple, peach, vanilla, and florals that intensified as the coffee cooled in the cup. We wanted to explore how resilient this coffee could be. Displayed in the graph above are two different approaches to roasting with different brewing methods in mind.

The first roast, PR-0095 (red) was roasted to be within cupping specifications and for pourover evaluation. After the roast reaches first crack, the amount of citric and malic acids will begin to lower in intensity with the combination of higher temperatures and length of time in the roaster. With this in mind, we did not want to exceed 2 minutes of development time after the roast. The second roast, PR-0096 (blue) was taken to second crack and intended for pour over and and espresso. Lengthening the development time to increase the ratio of sugar browning to enzymatic acids is an obvious solution. Delaying our first gas adjustment by 45 seconds also created a slower rate of rise through the maillard stage in an effort to create more body in the cup.